U2 and Lamar's XXX

"XXX" is truly two melodies in one. The first half is a vengeance illustration with Old Testament hints, scored with reptilian 808's, stirring synths, and stark sirens. Lamar gets notification from a companion that his exclusive child has been killed — a resounding reference on Good Friday — and it sends Lamar turning into dreams of retaliation that skirt on lewdness. ("Sick catch a n**** leavin' benefit if that is all I got.") Like whatever remains of DAMN.,"XXX" is an articulated takeoff from the luxurious soul-jazz ensembles of Lamar's past collection, the 2015 perfect work of art To Pimp A Butterfly, rather supporting a meager soundscape that puts the accentuation on Lamar's virtuosic lyricism and the melancholy wrath of his conveyance.

U2 doesn't enter "XXX" until the second half. However, it's not the fantastic Joshua Tree-style ballyhoo that many foreseen. Rather, this is U2 in Zooropa mode, in which additional accentuation is put on the transaction between drummer Larry Mullen and bassist Adam Clayton. The Edge's particular guitar, in the interim, is M.I.A. (Is The Edge playing those extra gospel piano harmonies? If not, then he more likely than not been consigned to joint-moving obligation amid the session.)

In this segment of "XXX," Lamar turns from story to sermon, straightforwardly tending to a culture that is consistently at war with itself, certainly drawing an association between the hunger for vengeance in the tune's first half to the ceaseless cycle of Americans obliterating different Americans out of a constant feeling of oppression. Once more, the religious implications are made plain: "Hail Mary, Jesus, and Joseph/The colossal American banner is wrapped and dragged with explosives," Lamar says. He then goes ahead to connection road savagery with Wall Street debasement, in which "workers and managers with maniacal contemplations" prompt the awfulness of a Donald Trump administration. (How strong does the collection front of To Pimp A Butterfly appear to be currently only three months expelled from the Obama time?)

Bono's vocal snare is a greatly Bono vocal snare, in that it appears to convey wide truths without very appearing well and good: "It's not a place/This nation is to be the sound of drum and bass/You close your eyes and glance around." Aside from the yell out to his young men Larry and Adam, what Bono appears to allude to is a natural subject from various U2 tunes: Mankind interminably feels disengaged inside and out — physically, inwardly, profoundly — –which sends our eyes heavenward looking for direction and, ideally, deliverance. Afterward, Lamar distils this inclination down to a question: "However is America legitimate or do we lounge in wrongdoing?"

What's striking about "XXX" is the means by which Bono, one of shake's extraordinary seething braggarts, totally sublimates himself to Lamar, permitting himself to be utilized as a paint shading in a bigger canvas. The supposition (or dread) was that U2 would subsume Lamar, however, plainly all included gatherings never questioned that Lamar would be in complete control.

U2 Sued For 5M

New York:  TMZ is reporting this morning that U2's song "The Fly" maybe the creative work of Paul Rose, a writer, guitarist with 12 solo albums of his own. 

The claim is that the boys straight up copied the music for the "The Fly" from his 1989 song "Nae Slappin"  Rose states that he provided Island records a demo that happened to be around the same time that U2 was signed to the label.

What is interesting to note is that Paul has awaited 25 years to sue and now expects 5M in damages. Gotta wonder if this is just a cash in or real cause for claim. Heck you take a listen and tell us what you think.

Drop your comments on our forum or of course on FB

 

 

 

U2 Back in Studio with Lilywhite

Watch for a new magazine profile come out early next week about the boys and their studio plans as well as the upcoming tour.  A noteworthy comment about a remix of "Red Hill Mining Town" to be pushed out before the tour starting later this year. Ah, wait a minute we also heard that "Songs Of Experience" may be ready late 2017 ahead of a tour kicking off Spring of 2018.   

The band is expected to head back into Electric Lady Studios with magic man Steve Lillywhite to fine tune the album.

We can expect that some of the lyrics may be getting uplift now that the US elections are over and Donald Trump is in office.  Clayton suggested that they have about 15 to 16 songs however the album will only produce 12 songs.

This long-awaited album has been the focus for many, the band, fans and of course Live Nation that wraps the tour around a successful release. Waiting can be settling for most. However, U2 has always worked on releasing on their schedule.

Nothing comes out before they are totally decided on the vibe, the feeling and the ability to perform those songs live. A couple of tracks have been named, yet to be confirmed. "The Showmen"  “The Little Things That Give You Away,” “Red Flag Day” and “Summer of Love,” the last two of which deal with the refugee crisis. Another track is called “The Best Thing About You Is Me,” all reported in the next edition of MoJo

U2's March 1987

U2's fifth studio album was about to be released, produced by Daniel Lanois and Brian Eno on Island Records.  What a year. 

After many years of research, a new drug as discovered for the treatment of AIDS. The stock market did a nose dive around the world. Baby M case. A New Jersey court declares the First Case in an American court ruling on the validity of Surrogacy over custody rights of "Baby M" re a surrogacy agreement with Mary Beth Whitehead.

Terry Waite Kidnapping, FOX network born, creating the 4th network on U.S airwaves and the Simpsons appeared on TV for the first time.  Prozac debuts, Regan Years, Wall Street, Dirty Dancing and yet in all of that noise a band for Dublin awakens the American spirit to drive hate into the darkness. 

I love being there, I love America, I love the feeling of the wide open spaces, I love the deserts, I love the mountain ranges, I even love the cities. So having fallen in love with America over the years that we’ve been there on tour, I then had to ‘deal with’ America and the way it was affecting me, because America’s having such an effect on the world at the moment. On this record I had to deal with it on a political level for the first time, if in a subtle way.
— Bono

1987 was a year filled with promise, despair, tears and joy and U2 took over the airwaves of Rock, Pop stations across America with the band aimed for a harder-hitting sound within the limitation of conventional song structures on The Joshua Tree.

The album is influenced by American and Irish roots music, and depicts the band's love–hate relationship with the United States, using socially and politically conscious lyrics embellished with spiritual imagery. The album received critical acclaim with chart-topping songs:
 "With or Without You," "I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For," and "Where the Streets Have No Name," the first two of which became the group's only number-one singles in the US.

The Boys won a few Grammy's for Album of the Year and Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal in 1988.   Hitting the road in 1987 with a record breaking tour, selling out venues around the world.

Critics could no longer ignore the boys from Dublin, placing them on the list of one of the greatest albums of all time, with over 25 million copies sold.

The boys released a remastered edition to push the album forward into a digital age, and in 2014 it was deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" by the US Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Recording Registry.

"Outside its America"